Articles tagged in reflection

  1. Death, on-line and off-line

    TWiT.TV net@nite I was listening to net@nite episode 2 with Amber MacArthur and Leo Laporte on my way to work last week. They were discussing a new service, MyFinalParty.com, a website that helps you to plan "not only your funeral but also everything else". Then a website called MyDeadSpace.com, a tribute site for all those who have died on MySpace. It started from around 13m35s and continued to around 20m into the show.

    Amber: "I think the Internet generation and people online as being like full of life and energy and all of sudden you see this 'dark side'...

    Leo: "If you think about it, it just shows how young the net is really... death is part of life, and of course everywhere else you have this going on..."

    True. It's sad, and it's depressed. You hang around on the Internet, read a few blogs here and there, subscribe to a few RSS feeds, and have "friends" you never met on all popular social networks. Everything looks so refreshing -- at yet so deceiving. The very fact of death is there, but most people avoid thinking about it just like what we do in our real lives.

    Someone on your Bloglines or Google Readers that has somehow stopped posting anymore? What about that guy on Friendster that you have never heard again since last July? Are they still around? Are they still alive?

    I have actually seen quite a few "death notices" in some of the development blogs that I have subscribed to. Of course it is not the dead person posting, but somehow one of the team mates discovered the accident that killed that developer a few days later, and then posted about it. It's always shocking reading your daily development news and then suddenly an item like this hits you in the face. What about all these open source projects where there's no team mates checking up on each other? They just cease to update?

    Death is there, and is still part of our lives. No, Web 2.0 did not cure it.

    I guess that's why services like MyFinalParty.com will be popular. Since death is inevitable, then might as well organise a big bash for your family and friends, although you won't be able to attend it yourself. Nevertheless, they have promised that "you will not be disappointed".

    Yeah right. Death itself is the biggest disappointment in life. It's wages of sin, it's judgement of God, and the only cure is Jesus, through trusting his work of salvation.

    Maybe death should be more talked about on the net.

    (btw, don't be too alarmed if I has failed to post something for a week)